Sharing is caring!

Over the course of owning your Android device, you’ve probably connected to dozens of Wi-Fi networks. School, home, work, the gym, your friends’ and family’s houses, coffee shops—each time you typed in one of these Wi-Fi passwords, your Android device saved it for safekeeping and easy access in the future.

The only trouble here is that you can’t view the saved Wi-Fi passwords that your device has stored. Perhaps you want to connect a second device to one of these networks, or you’re with a friend who wants to log in to the same hotspot, but without a way to access the actual passwords that your device has stored, you’re out of luck.

So developer Alexandros Schillings decided to remedy this issue with an app that allows you to view every Wi-Fi password that you’ve ever saved on your Android device. The app requires root access, but beyond that, it makes finding and sharing your stored Wi-Fi passwords incredibly easy.

Step 1: Install WiFi Key Recovery

Schillings’ app is called WiFi Key Recovery, and it’s available on the Google Play Store for free. Search the app by name to get it installed on your rooted device, or head directly to the install page at this link.

Step 2: Viewing Saved Wi-Fi Passwords

When you first launch WiFi Key Recovery, the app will ask for Superuser access. Tap “Grant” on the popup, then you’ll be taken to a list containing all of the Wi-Fi networks that you’ve ever connected to, where each entry shows a password in the “psk” field.

If you’ve connected to many different Wi-Fi networks over the course of owning your Android device, your list may be quite long. If that’s the case, you can search for a particular Wi-Fi network by using the “SSID Quicksearch” field.

Step 3: Sharing Wi-Fi Passwords

If you need to share one of these passwords with another device, you have a few options. Start by tapping any entry in the list, then a small menu will pop up. This allows you to use Android’s built-in sharing system to send either just the password, or the entire entry. There’s also an option for sharing via QR code, but that requires that you install an additional app.

If you’d like to store this entire list for safekeeping, tap your device’s hardware menu button (or the three-dot menu button in your software navigation bar). From here, choose “Export” to generate a text file with all of this information.

How to Fully Control Your Android Device from Any Computer

From here, you can use Android’s share menu to send this file to another device, or you can simply tap “To SD” if you’d rather save a copy of this text file to your device’s storage partition. And of course, if your list isn’t too long, you can always take (and share) a screenshot.

Sharing is caring!